The phony texts — as well as emails — come with a variety of traps designed to lure unwitting recipients into a potential world of computer viruses, stolen password credentials or driver’s license numbers, and identity theft. Hundreds of people have contacted White’s office with questions and complaints about the scam, Druker said. Likewise, IDOT spokesman Guy Tridgell said the agency has received inquiries from likely hundreds of people.

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